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Karen Kay

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According to the BBC website, hundreds of fairy doors have been attached to the bases of trees in Wayford Woods, Crewkerne.

It is claimed the doors have been installed by local people so children can “leave messages for the fairies”.

But trustee Steven Acreman said: “We’ve got little doors everywhere. We’re not anti-fairies but it’s in danger of getting out of control.” READ MORE HERE

FAE’s Editor in Chief, Karen Kay, will be talking live on BBC Local Radio throughout the UK to Mark Forrest about Fairy Doors and why they are so important.

Karen says “As long as the doors are created from natural and biodegradable materials, I believe it is a beautiful thing to do, plus it gives hope to the youngsters, and older ones too!”

Our friends over at the Fairyland Trust say they do not want to discourage making Fairy Houses, “indeed we do it at the Fairy Fair and other events but agree that a balance needs to be struck to make the developments sustainable, and not damaging to the woods.”

They have issued these Fairy Planning Guidelines regarding the installation of Fairy Doors:

1. Avoid using plastic and metal in any Fairy construction, including silver foil, or any non water-based paints.  Fairies do not appreciate these artificial materials.  Instead try to use natural materials which can be nibbled by creatures like Wood Mice, and in the end, grown on by mushrooms and toadstools.  Untreated wood, twigs, hessian, and natural string (eg jute twine) are all good.

2. Magical creatures know that humans provide slides and chairs and other garden furniture with good intentions (at the Fairy Fair we’ve noticed some fairy jacuzzis) but we don’t really use them.  We bathe in Fairy Basins for example (also known as buttercups) and like to sleep on banks of moss and in Cowslip Bells, and shelter from the rain in Wood Sorrel blossoms  – so please leave those for us.  A few snail shells are good as garden ornaments, as are acorn cups, beech-mast and other tree seeds.

3. We noticed that Wayford Wood is an Ancient Woodland, the very best type for Fairies.  It also has lots of lovely Bluebells.  Please never ever trample on these (keep to the paths).  Not only do they look beautiful and smell fantastic but they are vital Fairy equipment. You may have read of folklore that says Fairies ring the Bluebells at midnight to call one another to their revels (parties).  As parties are important, we’d appreciate protecting the Bluebells.  We are unlikely to use any doorways where Bluebells have been squished.
4. Don’t use cement, nails or screws to fix doors to trees.  The trees don’t like it.

Mermaids & Mythology Magazine

Mermaids & Mythology

Mermaids & Mythology is the new sis*star publication to FAE Magazine (Faeries and Enchantment). It will be published 4 times a year and is a ‘real’ full sized, full colour glossy magazine, and will be 100% carbon neutral and printed on FSC paper (just like it’s sis*star FAE).

The logo has been designed by Tamara Newman and the debut issue will feature the stunning artwork of David Delamare, and coverage of the World Mermaid Awards. Plus mermaid fashion, and stories of mythology and more… Mer-Team members include Doreen Virtue, Lucy Cavendish, Melissa Mermaid, Emily Carding, and Editor in Chief, Karen Kay. Visit www.themermaidmagazine.com or join Mermaids & Mythology on Facebook

Faery Magic by Lucy Cavendish and Serene Conneeley

Faeries have long captured the imagination, inspiring people to weave mystical stories, create beautiful art and protect and hold nature as sacred. The very idea of them lifts the spirits, opens the heart and the mind, reminds us of the secret longings of our soul, and fills us with happiness, spontaneity and childlike wonder.

Including fun faery  interviews with: Jessica Galbreth,  Doreen Virtue, Cassandra EasonSelina FenechLady Amaranth,  Karen Kay,  Izzy Ivy,  Juliet MarillierCara Walker,  Wendy Rule and Amelia Sayers

The Book of Faery Magic is a must for anyone wanting to grow closer to nature and to their own wild self. Rich in tradition, history, research and faery lore, it is filled with whimsical accounts of interaction with the fae, grounded guidance on working with them, and beautiful ideas for reconnection with the magical realms. From the faeries we can rediscover who we really are, and awaken our natural abilities to create wonderful, enchanted lives that are full of meaning and purpose, fun and delight.

Whether you believe that faeries are truth or fantasy, The Book of Faery Magic is your portal to a state of being where fun, light-hearted and healing energy will help you fulfil all your dreams, transform your life and improve your relationship with the earth, your self and others. Within these magical pages you will:

* Work with the faeries for health and happiness.
* Be granted the Seven Magical Gifts of Faery.
* Meet different faeries from around the world.
* Learn the legends, lore and history of the Little People.
* Visit the planet’s most sacred faery sites.
* Discover the magical properties of faery flowers, herbs and trees.
* Plant your own enchanted garden and brew intoxicating potions.
* Host a magical tea party and bake faery treats.
* Become an eco faery and help make the world a better place.
* Hear from famous faery artists, writers, healers and singers.
* Find out what kind of faery you are, and much much more…

The Book of Faery Magic
by Lucy Cavendish and Serene Conneeley
Blessed Bee, $34.95.

SOURCE  www.faerymagic.net

If you want to know about the lady behind FAE Magazine visit her new website www.karenkay.co.uk


On her new website designed by Michael Tingle you can find out about her past and present, her faerie music and meditations, FAE Magazine, faery events, faerie balls, faerie fayres and faery festival. Did you know that Karen appeared in the cult film, Breaking Glass starring Hazel O’Connor? Find out this and much more on her brand new website: www.karenkay.co.uk

A photograph of singer Emily Ovenden, taken by Hayley Madden and featured in FAE has won an award.

Hayley Madden told FAE, “I recently joined the SWPP, a society aimed at professional portrait and wedding photographers. They are an international organisation and hold monthly competitions for members only. The competition has hundreds of entries from all over the world and only a handful get selected as Gold award winners. These are images deemed to be of the highest standard based on composition, artistry, technical excellence and photographic skill. I entered two images not really expecting to get anywhere on my first attempt (there are silver and bronze awards too – I was hoping I might scrape a bronze) and when the results came out for January – I looked for my image. The score was a ‘G’. What’s ‘G’ I thought to myself – good?, or is it A, B, C, D….G for really bad. Then it dawned on me that it had won a ‘G’ for gold. This image was one that Emily selected from a shoot for Celtic Legend but was never fully developed at the time. Fae Magazine’s insistence on original images for its publication pulled it out of the archives and into the spotlight where it belongs. I owe Emily for the good editing and modelling, Rachel Vanasch for the inspiration dress and Karen Kay for her constant support and always setting the bar high”.


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